Family Law

Litigation over separation, divorce and child custody is often emotionally charged. Our goal is to assist our clients in navigating through the litigation process and the issues that necessarily arise in conjunction with divorce, such as equitable division, custody arrangements, child support and alimony

Divorce

Divorce

In South Carolina, divorce is granted on one of two grounds: fault ground or no-fault ground. Fault grounds include adultery, desertion, physical cruelty, habitual drunkenness or abuse of narcotics. The no-fault ground is based upon one-year continuous separation. View more

Separation

Separation

While South Carolina does not have “legal separation,” a Decree of Separate Support and Maintenance may be obtained in advance of a divorce. This Order, or Decree, does not cover the issue of divorce and does not end the parties’ marriage.View more

Child Support

Child Support

Child support is generally calculated using the South Carolina Child Support Guidelines. These guidelines take into account a variety of factors including the gross monthly income of both parties, the cost of any work-related day care, any health insurance premium covering the minor child(ren), and any other child(ren) for whom a party is legally responsible. View more

Child Custody

Child Custody

Generally, the most emotional issue that must be resolved in divorce is child custody and visitation. Legal custody of a child refers to the legal right and responsibility to make important decisions regarding the child. View more

Alimony

Alimony or separate

Separate Support and Maintenance refers to money paid by one spouse to another after the filing of an action and before a divorce is granted. Alimony refers to money paid by one spouse to another after a divorce is granted. In South Carolina, either spouse may seek spousal support. View more

Equitable distribution

Equitable distribution

South Carolina’s marital property laws, like most states, follow equitable division of property. This means that the court will not necessarily divide real and personal property, acquired during the marriage, evenly between the parties involved. View more